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    Your Elvenar Team

Anyone speak a different language?

sambria

Chef
Just wanted to know if anyone could speak another language.

My second language is French. I have a family background in the Quebec's people. My grandmothers father was a chief of a Quebecian tribe way back when.

What language can yall speak?

(And i also went to a French emersion school as a kid)


Je voulais juste savoir si quelqu'un pouvait parler une autre langue.

Ma deuxième langue est le français. J'ai une origine familiale dans le peuple Québécois. Le père de ma grand-mère était chef d'une tribu québécoise à l'époque.

Quelle langue pouvez-vous parler ?
 

AtaguS

Well-Known Member
hablo un poco espanol, mi espanol es mas bueno cuando estoy en centro america para un tiempo largo

pero creo que hablo como un nino de dos anos :D
 

Darielle

Chef, Scroll-Keeper, and Buddy Fan Club Member
Hallo! Ich spreche Deutsch, aber schlect! Ich brauche mehr zeit zu lernen. Mein Mann (ex) kommt aus Velbert, Deutschland, und seine mutter mit uns lebt fur zwei jahr. Sie wollt nicht Englisch lernen ... sie sagt immer "Du bist jung; ich bin alt! DU lernen!) So, ja, ich lerne, aber nicht so gut, lol. I habe nur zwei mal Deutschland besuchen, und ich habe keinen Deutscher freunden in der naher zu mir helfen.

I hope Germans can understand me, lol ... I haven't spoken it in so many years that I'm really rusty. :)
 

CrazyWizard

Well-Known Member
Hello I speak and understand english,
Auch sprache und versteh ich deutch,
Mijn moedertaal is nederlands,
또 한글학요에소 갔어요

So I speak english with a American accent fluently, but I do mix it with british english words and write british as that's the way I learned it.
I understand german reasonably well, passively I can understand almost everything, but spoken it much more of a challenge and I sound more like a intermediate studend, the eccent is ok, and I can fake quite a lot due to the similarities between my mothertonge and german.
My mothertonge us Dutch but as in all languages I am pretty bad at grammer.
A few years ago I spend a few years learning korean but it's really hard due the fact that I have very few possibilities to use it. and I an not someone who learns well from a book and much easier learn in the wild. unfortunately korean isn't quick nor cheap to visit.
 
Let's see, I speak English as my first language, und ich kann auch Deutsch sprechen, aber ich bin nicht fliessig.
I can read a fair amount of Spanish and French, and understand a little spoken.
My Latin is a little rusty, although once pretty advanced (anyone for The Hobbit?), and I can read some Ancient Greek.
I'm learning Russian slowly, not because it's hard but because I keep forgetting to study. :rolleyes:
Other languages I have studied on and off and can read or understand a smattering of: Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Norwegian, Swedish, Chinese, Arabic, Quenya and Sindarin (these only halfway count, as constructed languages), plus probably a couple dozen others that I've dabbled in briefly over the years.

Languages are fun. :D
 

Darielle

Chef, Scroll-Keeper, and Buddy Fan Club Member
Let's see, I speak English as my first language, und ich kann auch Deutsch sprechen, aber ich bin nicht fliessig.
I can read a fair amount of Spanish and French, and understand a little spoken.
My Latin is a little rusty, although once pretty advanced (anyone for The Hobbit?), and I can read some Ancient Greek.
I'm learning Russian slowly, not because it's hard but because I keep forgetting to study. :rolleyes:
Other languages I have studied on and off and can read or understand a smattering of: Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Norwegian, Swedish, Chinese, Arabic, Quenya and Sindarin (these only halfway count, as constructed languages), plus probably a couple dozen others that I've dabbled in briefly over the years.

Languages are fun. :D
I agree. I felt I had to learn Old English in order to write one of my books, and it was fascinating to see the progression between Old, Middle, and modern English. We were much more German in our language in the old days than we are now. But then, half of England is of German descent, if you go far enough back (I'm talking 7-800s ad).
 

crackie

Chef, Scroll-Keeper, Buddy's #1 Fan
I wish there was a like button so I can just appreciate all your posts, mainly because I can see how rewarding it can be if you're actually doing it from a place of genuine curiosity and willingness to learn, but my forays into foreign languages have been somewhat disastrous. In school, I signed up for French. However, when I got my schedule the following year, they had me down for ESPAÑOL. I was too lazy to make an appointment with my guidance counselor to sort it out so I wound up studying a language I didn't want for 5 years. The most use I've gotten out of it was switching to the SAP audio feed for Spanish broadcasting whenever I'm watching a baseball game with really bad announcers (see also: Joe Buck). Now in my recreational co-ed leagues, my Dominican teammates forget I can sometimes understand them. Apparently, while some teammates have cool nicknames like "El Diablo" for the chaos and destruction they bring to the plate or "El Gato" for the cat-like reflexes on defense, I learned my nickname is..."Pata de Plomo". No, Netflix Narcos fans. It's nothing as gangster as "Plata o Plomo". My Spanish nickname is "Lead Legs", for the awesome speed in which I grace the field. They tell me I should be honored I got a Spanish nickname because it shows they've accepted me into "their club", but I dunno... :oops: I am thankful Netflix has so much international programming to offer though so I can brush up on my Spanish again. (Money Heist, anyone?)

Also simultaneously around the time the computer glitch signed me up for ESPAÑOL, my forward thinking parents decided to sign me up for Chinese school so I can be better prepared to take on international business scene when China becomes the dominant global economic powerhouse that it is today. At least in their mind, that's how it plays out. The execution, however, was that I was assigned to a class with 1st graders, even though I was already in the 8th grade, because we are all equally beginners. Nothing kills your academic self-confidence like playing Billy Madison in real life! We'd get assignments like having to do speech contests so now I have to test my oratory skills against 7yos. Like, what's the proper amount of effort for a situation like that? Are you supposed to give an impassioned speech about saving the world while they get to talk about eating ice cream for dessert yesterday? To further pour gasoline on the whole situation, there were even bigger delinquents than me in class who were already in high school, but share similarly annoying parents. They would tell me to come hang out with them during breaks. When your choices are innocent 1st graders or delinquent high schoolers, you're going to end up hanging with the wrong crowd. Peer pressure is real, y'all! Our 5 min breaks were 30 mins long because nobody wanted to be there as we mostly resented having lost our Sundays. Thankfully that miserable experience lasted only 2 years instead of 5. However, I did learn in my half-assed attempt at learning Chinese that I am infinitely better at listening than reading/writing. It's such a strange language where if you don't know the word, you can't even know where to begin butchering the misspelling. Like you can't even just misspell it phonetically so the other party knows what you're trying to write. Now I do notice when I see people with tattoos of Chinese characters that a lot of it is written badly, like by a 1st grader, because I recognize my own terrible Chinese penmanship in it! (And no, I don't know how to type in Chinese either!) [/end therapy]
 
I agree. I felt I had to learn Old English in order to write one of my books, and it was fascinating to see the progression between Old, Middle, and modern English. We were much more German in our language in the old days than we are now. But then, half of England is of German descent, if you go far enough back (I'm talking 7-800s ad).
Wow, totally lost this notification!

That's some dedication to writing, Darielle! Fiction or non-fiction? I genuinely think that someone could construct a book that starts out in modern English and slowly introduces words and grammar concepts moving backward in time until by the end of the book you'd be reading in Old English. It's amazing how they initially look so different, but then actually aren't so much when you start to break it down (especially if you say words aloud!). Even lots of modern German words are extremely similar to English, or eminently guessable if you see a few spelling pattern differences (sch/sh, b/v, etc.)
 

Darielle

Chef, Scroll-Keeper, and Buddy Fan Club Member
Wow, totally lost this notification!

That's some dedication to writing, Darielle! Fiction or non-fiction? I genuinely think that someone could construct a book that starts out in modern English and slowly introduces words and grammar concepts moving backward in time until by the end of the book you'd be reading in Old English. It's amazing how they initially look so different, but then actually aren't so much when you start to break it down (especially if you say words aloud!). Even lots of modern German words are extremely similar to English, or eminently guessable if you see a few spelling pattern differences (sch/sh, b/v, etc.)
Fiction. I'm an editor and have some great clients, but I occasionally dabble in my own novels just for fun. I don't market them, so I'll never make the kind of money on them that my clients make on their books, but it's enjoyable. Now that I'm semi-retired I have a BIT more time for it (I'm the editor of the Arizona Authors Association and put out a publication 6x a year, so that takes up a good deal of time). One of the books that required linguistic research was my Elf novel, Doonal's Kin.

I agree with you on the German-English connection. My son is currently learning German; I learned it years ago but forgot a great deal, lol. Still, it's much easier for an American to learn than, say, Spanish.
 
@crackie I'm sorry you had unfun experiences. :( Have you tried language learning again as an adult? If you'd still be interested in French, I love this program: https://coffeebreaklanguages.com/coffeebreakfrench/ They have a paid version with extra practices and so on, but there is also a completely free podcast that has a ton of material; I think the links for that are about a third of the way down the page.
 

Myne

Well-Known Member
I am fluent in Southern English, and heavily accented Greek. No habla espaniol though
 

Sprite1313

Well-Known Member
It's amazing how they initially look so different, but then actually aren't so much when you start to break it down (especially if you say words aloud!). Even lots of modern German words are extremely similar to English, or eminently guessable if you see a few spelling pattern differences (sch/sh, b/v, etc.)
One of my favourite classes on college was an introductory etymology class. The textbook was the full 24-volume OED, and it was a lot of fun to trace the roots of words and see the transition as the Celtic languages collided with German and Scandinavian, with bits and pieces of Arabic (hello Ottomans, thank you for the coffee) and others added in over time.
 

Myne

Well-Known Member
Fiction. I'm an editor and have some great clients, but I occasionally dabble in my own novels just for fun. I don't market them, so I'll never make the kind of money on them that my clients make on their books, but it's enjoyable. Now that I'm semi-retired I have a BIT more time for it (I'm the editor of the Arizona Authors Association and put out a publication 6x a year, so that takes up a good deal of time). One of the books that required linguistic research was my Elf novel, Doonal's Kin.

I agree with you on the German-English connection. My son is currently learning German; I learned it years ago but forgot a great deal, lol. Still, it's much easier for an American to learn than, say, Spanish.

Did you publish on Kindle??
 

Swordkin

Member
@Darielle Ich ferstehe dich, Ich wohne in Danemark, dreizig minuten nord die grenze von Deutschland. Als kinder Ich hat Deutch gelernt in schule, aber diesen tage ich verwenden die deutche sprache gar nicht.
 

BrinDarby

Well-Known Member
While English is native to me, Yo hablo espanol, pero mi
problema es un vocabulario muy pequeno....
Not sure if these count to you, but they are languages ...
HTML, Basic, Cobol, Fortran, Pascal, Hexidecimal, Binary ....;)
 

Darielle

Chef, Scroll-Keeper, and Buddy Fan Club Member
@Darielle Ich ferstehe dich, Ich wohne in Danemark, dreizig minuten nord die grenze von Deutschland. Als kinder Ich hat Deutch gelernt in schule, aber diesen tage ich verwenden die deutche sprache gar nicht.
Ich auch nicht. Danemark ist ganz shon; Ich besuche im 1986 Copenhagen, aber ich habe kein Deutch in the letzte zwanzig jahren gesprochen! Mein Deutsch sind ganz schleckt, lol. :)
 

crackie

Chef, Scroll-Keeper, Buddy's #1 Fan
@crackie I'm sorry you had unfun experiences. :( Have you tried language learning again as an adult? If you'd still be interested in French, I love this program: https://coffeebreaklanguages.com/coffeebreakfrench/ They have a paid version with extra practices and so on, but there is also a completely free podcast that has a ton of material; I think the links for that are about a third of the way down the page.
I didn't have a foreign language requirement in college (if you call that "adult"), but I tried to sign up for Japanese to try something different for fun. Then the Universe intervened again. The Japanese 1 time slot I signed up for, they changed it from a 3-credit course to a 5-credit intensive. I think instead of twice a week for 1.5hrs, it turned into 4hrs, once a week so I said, oh HELLS NO! Ain't got the mental stamina to handle 4hrs of anything. I was also supposed to be working on my Senior Project so no time to be taking 5-credit intensives for fun!
 
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